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Messages - wellery

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46
General Discussion / Re: 1934 dodge
« on: December 27, 2011, 06:51:45 PM »
Tony

Awesome find - do you have to go to Adelaide to get her?

Wayne

47
General Discussion / Re: MERRY CHRISTMAS and HAPPY NEW YEAR !!!!
« on: December 26, 2011, 10:11:00 PM »
Hi all

Go this just before Xmas - the plymouth fairies must have been coming past - another 29U this time a tourer

Cheers

Wayne


48
General Discussion / Re: MERRY CHRISTMAS and HAPPY NEW YEAR !!!!
« on: December 21, 2011, 06:58:36 PM »
To all

Have a very merry xmas and a happy and safe new year - it wont be long before our troops are home and safe downunder as well!!!!

Thanks to all on the board for their help this year and I am sure I will be asking questions again!!!

God Bless all

Wayne

49
General Discussion / Re: Fabric/rubberized U-Joint Discs
« on: November 26, 2011, 07:03:40 PM »
Hi

Well done - so you got the new ones fitted?

Cheers

Wayne

50
General Discussion / Re: cracked exhaust manifold
« on: November 26, 2011, 06:48:31 PM »
Tony

Thats great !! - if I ever crack a manifold I know where I can take it to fix it.

all the best

Wayne

51
General Discussion / Re: Interior light
« on: November 17, 2011, 04:47:40 PM »
Tony

Dont have the problem - Iam working on a rodaster LOL - good find

Wayne

52
General Discussion / Re: cracked exhaust manifold
« on: November 15, 2011, 09:37:56 PM »
Tony think of it this way !!!!!


The Exhaust Pulse

To gain a more complete understanding of how mufflers and headers do their job, we must be familiar with the dynamics of the exhaust pulse itself. Exhaust gas does not come out of the engine in one continuous stream. Since exhaust valves open and close, exhaust gas will flow, then stop, and then flow again as the exhaust valve opens. The more cylinders you have, the closer together these pulses run.

Keep in mind that for a "pulse" to move, the leading edge must be of a higher pressure than the surrounding atmosphere. The "body" of a pulse is very close to ambient pressure, and the tail end of the pulse is lower than ambient. It is so low, in fact, that it is almost a complete vacuum! The pressure differential is what keeps a pulse moving. A good Mr. Wizard experiment to illustrate this is a coffee can with the metal ends cut out and replaced with the plastic lids. Cut a hole in one of the lids, point it toward a lit candle and thump on the other plastic lid. What happens? The candle flame jumps, then blows out! The "jump" is caused by the high-pressure bow of the pulse we just created, and the candle goes out because the trailing portion of the pulse doesn't have enough oxygen-containing air to support combustion. Neat, huh?

Ok, now that we know that exhaust gas is actually a series of pulses, we can use this knowledge to propagate the forward-motion to the tailpipe. How? Ah, more of the engineering tricks we are so fond of come in to play here.

Just as Paula Abdul will tell you that opposites attract, the low pressure tail end of an exhaust pulse will most definitely attract the high-pressure bow of the following pulse, effectively "sucking" it along. This is what's so cool about a header. The runners on a header are specifically tuned to allow our exhaust pulses to "line up" and "suck" each other along! Whoa, bet you didn't know that! This brings up a few more issues, since engines rev at various speeds, the exhaust pulses don't always exactly line up. Thus, the reason for the Try-Y header, a 4-into-1 header, etc. Most Honda headers are tuned to make the most horsepower in high RPM ranges; usually 4,500 to 6,500 RPM. A good 4-into-1 header, such as the ones sold by Gude, are optimal for that high winding horsepower you've always dreamed of. What are exhaust manifolds and stock exhaust systems good for? Besides a really cheap boat anchor? If you think about it, you'll realize that since stock exhausts are so good at restricting that they'll actually ram the exhaust pulses together and actually make pretty darn good low-end torque! Something to keep in mind, though, is that even though an OEM exhaust may make gobs of low-end torque, they are not the most efficient setup overall, since your engine has to work so hard to expel those exhaust gasses. Also, a header does a pretty good job of additionally "sucking" more exhaust from your combustion chamber, so on the next intake stroke there's lots more fresh air to burn. Think of it this way: At 8,000 RPM, your Integra GS-R is making 280 pulses per second. There's a lot more to be gained by minimizing pumping losses as this busy time than optimizing torque production during the slow season.



So in other words the crack in the manifold allowed for a fluctuation in pressure thus allowing an easy escape path for your exhaust gas, and also creating a back pressure problem (this more than likely increased the crack area/size) - so now with everything being equal the new exhaust adn the manifold gap sealed it has created the appropriate pressure (more like a vacuum) to allow the exhaust gas to be expelled more easily from the cylinder and the manifold down the exhaust system thus allowing more air/fuel mixture into the cylinder. A cleaner burn with fresher air to allow a more complete combustion thus creating a little more power and running smoother (in layman terms)

Hope this helps

Wayne

53
General Discussion / Re: Fabric/rubberized U-Joint Discs
« on: November 14, 2011, 07:35:45 PM »
Hi

Why not try the larger bolts and nuts to try and tighten them until the compression on the fibre discs allows for your other bolts and the castle nuts to be used and secured.

I am sure you are aware to do them up diagonally so as he they take up evenly

Just a thought

Wayne



54
General Discussion / Re: Demountable Rim/Felloe/Wheel Hardware Question
« on: November 03, 2011, 09:46:42 PM »
Ted

I am wondering wether we are talking about the same thing - My understanding is the Felloe is a segment or the whole rim of a wooden wheel to which the spokes are attached and onto which a metal tyre is usually shrunk - In our case in cars we have the Felloe that is attached to the spoked section of the wheel that bolts directly to the axle - then we have a demountable rim (which is steel) that has the flap tube and tyre (tire) mounted to it.

I hope I am not being rude but just want to clarify we are tlaking about the same thing - about what I call the Felloe or the Rim???? - I would hate to misleed you.

Cheers


Wayne

55
General Discussion / Re: Demountable Rim/Felloe/Wheel Hardware Question
« on: November 03, 2011, 09:31:26 PM »
Ted

This is a bloke fitting a demountable rim - u can see how he angles it to place the demountable on - hope this helps!!! - also dont forget to wear your best suit lots of laughs!!!

56
General Discussion / Re: Demountable Rim/Felloe/Wheel Hardware Question
« on: November 03, 2011, 08:33:12 PM »
Ted

Does it look like this

This is the sequence for installing the hardware on the brass tube stem when changing an inner tube. The dust cover is nickel plated.



57
General Discussion / changing tyres
« on: October 27, 2011, 09:55:55 PM »
Hi All

You have to watch this bloke put a tyre on a rim using a trash bag

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6sH8WRl6yI


Cheers

Wayne

58
General Discussion / Re: cracked exhaust manifold
« on: October 20, 2011, 08:24:47 AM »
Tony

Too much back pressure from the new exhaust? it will always find the weakest point the bugger.

Cheers

Wayne

59
There is one on Ebay item number 170707994566 - Antique Hudson Buick Kissel Nash Ford Dodge 1929 1927 1925 1920 Hub Wheel Puller - John would this do it?

Wayne

   

60
General Discussion / Re: Inner Tubes and Valve Stems
« on: October 13, 2011, 10:20:17 PM »
Maybe the  best way to go would be to have them Brass as being demountable rims and the likelihood of slippage on the wheel it may shear the rubber stem of also may happen when you get a flat and the tube moves around just a thought

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