Author Topic: brake lines  (Read 1640 times)

imoore

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brake lines
« on: October 03, 2016, 12:32:06 PM »
Hi all.

Just wondering if any one has used a double flare with success.
Reason I am asking I am about to replace all lines and I believe it is illegal to use single flare on brake lines here in aus.
The originals were single flare.

Ian
1928 Q tourer (Holden bodied)
Several vintage stationary engine

westaus29

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Re: brake lines
« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2016, 04:38:03 PM »
The original brake lines are copper and single flared, and most of the fittings are brass. My 29 Plymouth was restored from a wreck about 20 years ago and we decided to keep the brake system original as it has historical interest. I enlisted the help of a mate who was a qualified plumber. We used standard copper tubing and all the connections were first annealed then single flared. I think if you tried to double flare then the tubing may split due to work hardening. I also suspect it would not be a good fit in the original fittings. The pipes were also annealed after bending and were well supported on the chassis using the original mounting points with new clamps. The car was approved for concessional license without any problems and there have been no reliability issues.

If you want a modern alternative to copper, there is copper-nickel brake tubing which looks similar and is legal in Aus. In this case you may need to use steel brake line fittings from a later model mopar such as 1936-1938 Plymouth which uses standard bundy tubing double flared with almost identical brake cylinder castings.

regards Jim

There is some aussi information here which may be of interest: www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/technical.../110334-legality-cu-brake-lines.html

imoore

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Re: brake lines
« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2016, 08:50:01 AM »
thanks for that info Jim.
I have no issues in using copper lines. I just don't want to do it for a 2nd time if I decided to go full registration.
From what I understand the code is if it originally had copper then it Is safe to use. Now one of the comments mentioned copper brake tube.
Standard copper tubing is that just what you would get from Reece, Tradelink, etc


So reason for annealing on the corners, is this just to reduce the chance of cracking?
If I have to add more securing location, I will That's the easy bit. Article say 300mm apart. 

Ian
1928 Q tourer (Holden bodied)
Several vintage stationary engine

westaus29

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Re: brake lines
« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2016, 05:08:10 PM »
Hi Ian,

Annealing makes the tubing malleable and prevents cracking, most important when forming the flares and helps with bends too. Yes we got the copper tube from Tradelink and used a standard plumber's flaring tool and mini tubing cutter. If you go for full registration it pays to ask around and find an examiner who knows old cars otherwise they can make things difficult.

regards Jim

imoore

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Re: brake lines
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2016, 11:07:55 AM »
Alright
Thanks for your help

Ian
1928 Q tourer (Holden bodied)
Several vintage stationary engine

Old Man

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Re: brake lines
« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2016, 09:45:43 PM »
In Canada you're allowed to put back on what the vehicle came with. Most very early cars and trucks I've worked on had copper gas and brake lines. Highly illegal now on new cars. The mechanical certificate here in Ontario does not even require you to have the drive train in the vehicles. But the brakes must be up and working and all the lights. How you get vacuum wipers to work without the drive train has always been a problem. However most guys don't go through the mechanical certification until the vehicle is fully restored ,drive train and all. But that's it. If you could push the vehicle to the mechanic's shop, you could get it certified. After that you licence it and insure it and Bob's your uncle it's on the road. We do not have yearly mechanical testing,old or new vehicles. However all vehicles must go through the mechanical certification process when the ownership changes. However dealerships do not have to do it. They are exempt.