Author Topic: 1934 dodge  (Read 27710 times)

wellery

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Re: 1934 dodge
« Reply #15 on: January 09, 2012, 10:20:21 PM »
Glenn

This what the first ute looked like

wellery

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Re: 1934 dodge
« Reply #16 on: January 09, 2012, 10:22:29 PM »
The story of the utility truck or coupé utility– the ute – began in 1932, when a letter was received by Ford Australia’s plant at Geelong, Victoria. It was written by a farmer’s wife who’d had enough of riding to church in the farm truck and arriving in saturated clothing;

‘Why don’t you build people like us a vehicle to go to church in on a Sunday, and which can carry our pigs to market on Mondays?’ her letter asked.

Bank managers at the time would lend money to farmers to buy  a farm truck, but not a passenger car, hence the plea from one very fed up woman!

It arrived on the desk of managing director Hubert French who, instead of dictating a polite dismissal, passed the letter on to sales manager Scott Inglis.

1934 ute brochure.jpg (18314 bytes)He in turn showed it to plant superintendent Slim Westman, and the two of them took it to Ford Australia’s design department, which in 1932 consisted of one man…

Lewis Thornet Bandt was 22 years old and had already been singled out for bigger things with Ford.

Interviewed shortly before his death in 1987, Bandt recalled the moment when Westman and Inglis came to him with the letter.

The brochure for the first utility"

The whole thing had already started to germinate," said Bandt.

"Westman quite rightly reckoned that if we cut down a car and put a tray on the back, the whole thing would tear in half once there was weight in the back.

"I told him I would design it with a frame that came from the very back pillar, through to the central pillars, near the doors. I would arrange for another pillar to further strengthen that weak point where the cabin and tray joined. I said to Westman `Boss, them pigs are going to have a luxury ride around the city of Geelong!’ "

Bandt began by sketching the coupé utility on a 10 metre blackboard, depicting a front view as well as side and rear elevations. When they were seen by Westman some weeks later, he told Bandt to build two prototypes.

1934 ute restored.jpg (29293 bytes)On a wheelbase of 112 inches, with a rear tray that was 5ft 5ins long and had a payload of 1200 pounds, they were the first vehicles to also offer a comfortable all-weather cabin.

On first sight of the prototypes, Scott Inglis authorised a startup production run of 500 vehicles. Westman asked for – and got - £10,000 for tooling, and the first coupé utilities rolled off the Geelong assembly line in 1934.

Born out of a woman’s frustration with car designs of the day, the enclosed cab utility was initially regarded as a luxury. But the `ute’ was quickly accepted as a necessity of bush life, and won recognition around the world as the ideal farmer’s or tradesman’s vehicle.

Epilogue:
Lewis Thornet Bandt remained with Ford Australia until his retirement in 1976, after 48 years with the company. His  career included designing long-range fuel tanks for Spitfire and Thunderbolt fighter planes in WW2, design innovations for the UK-sourced Ford Zephyr, the 1967 Australian Ford Fairlane, and the never-approved Falcon convertible, of which six were built outside Ford in 1962.

Eleven years into his retirement, Bandt died on March 18, 1987, in an accident near Geelong between a sand truck and the vintage Ford ute that Bandt had rebuilt for himself (rego number UT 001, pictured last). This talented Australian is survived by the legacy of his design, which wins new friends around the world every day.

SDGlenn

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Re: 1934 dodge
« Reply #17 on: January 10, 2012, 12:06:46 AM »
Wayne, Thanks a whole lot. That was an excellent narration on the Ute. I really appreciate the history of the ute also. Thanks again.  I remember back in 1958 I cut the back end off a 1941 Chev 2 dr sedan, and built a box on the rear end to haul my tools, etc. Would that have been concidered a "Ute"?  I wish I had some of the cars I destroyed and beat the hell out of when I was a younger fella.
SDGlenn
SDGlenn

Tinkeys

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Re: 1934 dodge
« Reply #18 on: January 11, 2012, 07:26:41 AM »
Well made it back all went good took 8hrs towing back home , not a single bit of drama !
here are some pics !!

Tinkeys

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Re: 1934 dodge
« Reply #19 on: January 11, 2012, 07:29:02 AM »
Some more Pics !!

Tinkeys

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Re: 1934 dodge
« Reply #20 on: January 11, 2012, 07:30:49 AM »
Just a couple more !!

Tinkeys

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Re: 1934 dodge
« Reply #21 on: January 11, 2012, 07:36:35 AM »
Just a couple more !!
Motor has been sitting for 3 years since rebuild not started still need to finish of plumbing and wiring, cant wait for fir up day !

SDGlenn

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Re: 1934 dodge
« Reply #22 on: January 11, 2012, 11:47:35 AM »
Tony, that is a beautiful automoble... I not only envie you on the car find, but envie you on the fun you are going to have getting it all finished. Congratulations, beautiful.  Nice "Ute" also, I was expecting an old vehicle. lol
Later,
SDGlenn
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Tinkeys

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Re: 1934 dodge
« Reply #23 on: January 12, 2012, 06:21:33 AM »
Motor is almost ready for fire up just need to get oil pressure  and bottom radiator hose and it should make some noise tomorrow

1930

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Re: 1934 dodge
« Reply #24 on: January 12, 2012, 12:28:33 PM »
That sure is a pretty old Dodge
Jason Anderson

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Re: 1934 dodge
« Reply #25 on: January 12, 2012, 05:08:27 PM »
Ditto… really nice Dodge.

Chet…
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Gary 30U

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Re: 1934 dodge
« Reply #26 on: January 13, 2012, 06:14:55 PM »
Tony, Looks like you found a good one. Can't wait to see progress pictures.

Gary

Tinkeys

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Re: 1934 dodge
« Reply #27 on: January 13, 2012, 06:23:33 PM »
Got only five PSI  oil pressure next will check to see if oil pressure relieve valve is stuck open ! It ran for 45 seconds then shutdown until I find problem.

Tinkeys

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Re: 1934 dodge
« Reply #28 on: January 20, 2012, 06:50:37 AM »
Hi all !
Found oil pressure problem , it's not fixed yet , there is a repair inside block right beside no.5 conrod ,it looks as if at one stage no.5 rod worked loose and put a hole in oil gallery that runs along the engine block ,somebody has attempted to do a repair but was not very successful as oil was leaking back into sump as fast as oil pump could push . I have now attempted to grind back & reweld with crank in place but it's to difficult, so I tore down engine  which has everything new and only run off and on for no more tan 4 to 5 min In short intervals, all bearings are still fine and will be reused if block can be saved.
Next step is to repair block with crank out  I have no other choice !
I think I am going to use 98% nickel arc rods which are about $10.00 a piece down under
Sure hope I can plug that leak or it another engine !

1930

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Re: 1934 dodge
« Reply #29 on: January 21, 2012, 06:00:48 AM »
I wouldnt throw out the block if you cant fix it with welding, there are many epoxies that might work assuming there is no pressure to the broken area. It is easy to be skeptical concerning epoxies but these glues have come a long way in the past few years, we glue quarter panels and entire roof skins and in some cases frame rails into car per manufacturers recomendations and I have never had a come back for any glue failure.
Myself would put down the welder because it may blow a bigger hole than what you already have. Good luck either way and happy to provide more info on the epoxies.
Jason Anderson